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DEMO FAQ’S

Where Do AAT Dogs Come From?

Where Do AAT Dogs Come From?

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Mark Miller, a flight attendant for American Airlines, has been a loyal and compassionate member of Animal Samaritans’ AAT program for more than 5 years. He started the program with his West Highland terrier, Maxwell, and never imaged that a second dog, equally suited for animal therapy work, would wander into his life.

A few years ago, Mark and his partner Dr. Lenny Seese, received a puzzling phone call: A neighbor had found one of their dogs wandering in the desert. The problem was, Mark and Lenny’s animals were safe at home.  Curious, Mark decided to investigate.

Auggie, a three and a half year old terrier mix, was covered with sticks and stickers after spending two days and nights on the loose.  The dog’s fur was dirty and tangled. He had no collar and no tags. “We see and hear a lot of coyotes out there,” said Mark. “It’s a miracle he survived.”

Mark took the dog to a local veterinarian to have him looked at. Upon discovering Auggie was microchipped, Mark was able to track down Auggie’s owner in Palm Springs.

According to Auggie’s owner, his dog had slipped out of his collar during a recent visit to the groomer’s and the dog bolted from the store. Auggie darted into traffic and appeared to get clipped by a passing car before scampering out of sight. The entire grooming staff was out looking for him, but the dog was nowhere to be found.

While Auggie’s reunion with his master was sweet, it was ultimately brief. Auggie’s dying owner was enduring the later stages of AIDS. Mark and Lenny spent a long time with Auggie’s owner that day, and made Auggie’s owner a promise: If he needed to “go on vacation,” or had to be away from Auggie for any reason, they would take care of him—for as long as he needed.

The man smiled a knowing smile; he knew what Mark was saying, and yes, he was grateful to know that when he passed away Mark and Lenny would adopt little Auggie, his most precious and dearest friend in the world.

In adopting Auggie, Mark and Lenny have not only provided the dog with a safe and loving home, but also given Auggie a new purpose and joy in life: Animal Assisted Therapy.  Auggie now accompanies Mark and Maxwell on their AAT visits to cheer up and bring smiles to the sick and the lonely. Mark says he is the lucky one to have wandered into Auggie’s life.

There’s just no telling how a therapy dog will change a person’s life, including his owner’s.

Making Short Term Memories & Long Term Friends

Making Short Term Memories & Long Term Friends

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There’s an access code to the front door. No one gets lost, or just wanders off. Nor does there appear to be any reason to. The members all appear content, chit-chatting, watching old movies, and playing games together.

The living room flows into a spacious kitchen where staff—all with more than 10 years of longevity here—prepare snacks and gourmet lunches for a client base that often forgets who’s serving them and why.

In the adjacent game room, Arnita Strange, an Activity Counselor at Eisenhower Medical Center’s Five Star Club for 24 years, leads some dozen Alzheimer’s patients in a game of dominos.

“They may think we’re just playing games with them,” notes Denise Latini, a Registered Nurse and the Five Star Club’s General Manager, “but we’re exercising their brains, improving motor skills and strengthening coordination.”

Each day 20 to 30 members are brought to the club for a socially therapeutic experience, overseen by a professional and compassionate staff. They come from various backgrounds, yet are united by a shared, irreversible condition.  Odds are, none of them will see a cure in their lifetimes. Still, there is light here. There is camaraderie. There is laughter. And yes, there are dogs—every Monday through Friday, in fact.

Barbara Koch and her 12-year-old standard poodle, Lily, have been visiting the Five Star Club for several years. They belong to Animal Samaritans’ popular Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) program.

“The three most important things to our Alzheimer’s patients,” explains Latini, “are children, music, and animals…. Most of our members have had a pet.”

Pamela Hays and her AAT dog Maggie, a pit bull/lab mix, joined AAT in January. They visit the Five Star Club every Thursday afternoon.

“I think [the interaction] is as beautiful for me as it is for the clients,” says Hays. “Seeing them pet the dogs, relax, and share their childhood memories—I get a feeling of helping.”

Latini explains that most of her clients have a strong long-term memory, and that the dogs consistently evoke memories of their pets and general positive experiences from the past.

Eisenhower’s Five Star Club in Palm Desert is not merely a refuge for people with Alzheimer’s, it also benefits caregivers. According to Latini, 70% of those caring for loved ones with Alzheimer’s burn out.  Stress takes a toll, and according to Latini it’s not unusual for a caregiver to pass before a patient.

There are roughly 13,000 people in the Coachella Valley living with Alzheimer’s disease. Over the past six years, the number of patients with cancer and heart disease has dropped, as science has made important advances in treatment and prevention. And yet, the number of people with Alzheimer’s has surged 68%.

It is not a pretty disease. Embarrassment, denial, and shame compound it’s mental and physical toll.

Whitley is a salt and pepper, two-year old shih tzu who comes to the Five Star Club every Wednesday with her human, AAT volunteer Tiffany Ritchey.

The arm-sized AAT dog was a godsend to Ritchey’s disabled mother. “So, I decided to share her gifts with others,” Ritchey says with a smile.

“Some clients don’t remember meeting me from one week to the week, but they seem to remember Whitney,” explains Ritchey.  Especially when she sits on their laps, so they can hug and kiss her.

Charlie and Harley Cheer the Children

Charlie and Harley Cheer the Children

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Twice per month Harley, a black lab mix, and Charlie, a King Charles Cavalier, travel to Shelter from the Storm, a Desert Cities safe haven for women and children affected by domestic violence.  Ann Leiboh (Harley’s mom) and Suzy Walker (Charlie’s Mom), are part of Animal Samaritans’ Animal Assisted Therapy or AAT Program. They provide human fellowship to each person they visit, but their dogs are the program’s star attractions.

AAT dogs are specially trained to interact with children and adults. At Shelter from the Storm, AnSams’ AAT teams visit school classrooms where children may pet, groom and walk the dogs on a lead. Both Charlie and Harley perform a variety of tricks for their young audiences who, according to Shelter from the Storm Executive Director, Angelina Coe, “are always totally delighted” to see them.

“We are very grateful for the many hours Suzy and Ann have donated with Charlie and Harley throughout their several years of visiting us,” said Coe.

At Shelter from the Storm, older children will sometimes read to the dogs–not for the dogs, but to improve their reading skills.  Like all AAT dogs, Charlie and Harley are excellent listeners; they never interrupt, snicker, or judge, even when a child is struggling with his or her material. Many children (who may not have strong reading skills) will happily read several pages to AnSams’ therapy dogs that they might not read in a normal classroom setting because of anxiety.

Is Your Cat the Cat’s Meow?

Is Your Cat the Cat’s Meow?

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Animal Assisted Therapy has become a familiar term and concept in recent times, with most people envisioning a child reaching for a golden retriever by his hospital bed. Dogs are a unifying, universal healing tool for people of all ages who may be enduring physical or mental health challenges. Trained dogs and handlers are now visiting and assisting people worldwide, not just in hospitals, but also in nursing homes, mental health institutions, detention centers, schools, and courthouses.

Petting an animal, or even just watching an animal, has been shown to reduce stress and lower our blood pressure. Sometimes a certified therapy animal serves as a listening buddy for a child who is learning to read aloud, or as  motivation for a physical therapy patient to walk that extra step. Many times just the presence of an animal can calm us and lift our mood.

As more facilities request Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) services, more types of animals are making appearances. Some organizations now offer rabbits and alpacas!

In addition to AAT dogs, Animal Samaritans is seeking cats for its AAT program.

It takes a truly special feline to partake in AAT. One difference to consider between dogs and cats, is that while dogs tend to focus on the other dogs and humans in their vicinity, cats tend to focus more on feeling safe in a familiar territory.

Some cats are simply not interested in strangers, and may even hide under the bed during the neighborhood card game, for example. In contrast, some cats may want to socialize with humans gathered for a festive party in their house, but this does not assure they will want to  travel to new places outside their comfort zone. Then, once in a long while, you come across that cat who is ready to jump in the car and go meet some new people friends!

Cats that are potential AAT candidates need to not only possess gregarious personalities and an ability to adapt quickly to new environments, but also possess some the willingness to learn basic training commands that will ensure their safety and manageability.

To prepare your cat for AAT work, I recommend the following:  crate training; socializing through exposure with friends, family and neighbors; and transportation training that involves being crated and driven in the car without stress or discomfort. In addition, you should harness and leash train your future AAT cat.  Always attach kitty’s leash to a harness —it is not safe to attach a leash to your cat’s collar. Also, always use a basic leash, and never a retractable lead.

Cats need to be comfortable when picked up in a hurry or stroked in a potentially awkward manner. An AAT cat should possess a relatively mellow temperament and not spook easily by sudden noises or unusual smells.

A tolerance for grooming is also important for therapy cats, as they may need to be bathed and have their nails clipped. Some may even need to wear claw caps (temporary rubber or plastic tips to cover the sharp points on each claw).

Animal Samaritans has numerous criteria for its AAT animals. Whether a dog or cat, the animal must pass temperament testing and a basic good manners evaluation to participate in the program. (All dogs must obtain their Canine Good Citizen certification before participating in Animal Samaritans’ AAT program).

Kind-hearted humans should remember that it takes a very unique animal to not only tolerate, but also enjoy and thrive in a place where AAT visits occur. Even social happy-go-lucky pets may not be comfortable around the sights and smells of a medical building, nursing home, or special needs classroom.

Be honest with yourself about your cat and his or her individual preferences. Perhaps your feline has the right spark, but needs some training, in which case you can confer with a positive reinforcement behavior professional for help.

If your Fluffy has love and friendship to share with others, and a personality that calmly accepts new surroundings, situations, and people, consider involving him or her in Animal Samaritans’ Animal Assisted Therapy program. Of course, AnSams is always looking for more AAT dogs to meet the increasing demands of this popular program as well.

Sara McNutt is the owner and head trainer at The Pet Mentor, offering lessons in dog and cat training and behavior. She is a graduate of the famous Exotic Animal Training and Management Program at Moorpark College. The Pet Mentor can be reached at sara@thepetmentor.com or 760-851-5975.

Warm and Fuzzy

Warm and Fuzzy

1. Charlie and Harley Cheer the Children

Charlie and Harley Cheer the ChildrenTwice per month Harley, a black lab mix, and Charlie, a King Charles Cavalier, travel to Shelter from the Storm, a Desert Cities safe haven for women and children affected by domestic violence.  …(Read More)


2. Is Your Cat the Cat’s Meow?

Is Your Cat the Cat's Meow?Animal Assisted Therapy has become a familiar term and concept in recent times, with most people envisioning a child reaching for a golden retriever by his hospital bed. Dogs are a unifying, universal…(Read More)


3. Making Short Term Memories & Long Term Friends

Making Short Term Memories & Long Term FriendsThere’s an access code to the front door. No one gets lost, or just wanders off. Nor does there appear to be any reason to. The members all appear content, chit-chatting, watching old movies, and …(Read More)


4. Where Do AAT Dogs Come From?

Where Do AAT Dogs Come From?Mark Miller, a flight attendant for American Airlines, has been a loyal and compassionate member of Animal Samaritans’ AAT program for more than 5 years. He started the program with his West Highland …(Read More)


Boxes of Abandoned Pets Appearing in Thousand Palms

Boxes of Abandoned Pets Appearing in Thousand Palms

 

Thousand Palms, CA – July 15, 2013: Yesterday morning, Animal Samaritans’ shelter attendant Margie Orei spied a 1-1/2 foot by 1-1/2 foot cardboard box outside the front door of AnSams’ no-kill animal shelter and instinctively knew what was inside. The box was sealed shut with packing tape. Someone had punched small, crude holes in the sides, presumably for air, but then taped over them. Only a small slit at the top of the box remained unsealed.  Inside, three dehydrated, lethargic kittens struggled for life, crammed together with their own feces and urine, and a fourth dead sibling that succumbed to the heat and lack of air.

 

About six hours later, Animal Samaritans’ Adoptions Alliance Rescue Coordinator, Michelle Bergeron, was at Riverside County Animal Shelter (aka the pound) looking at animals to rescue, when she saw a box of six abandoned puppies. That marked the third box of abandoned newborns she had encountered this month.

 

Some people actually believe they are helping animals by boxing them up and dropping them off at an animal shelter, like swaddling a human baby and leaving him or her on the doorstep of a church or monastery. Someone inside will help, right?  But boxing up animals in our desert heat can be lethal, even at night, especially for nursing newborns. And for the animals that survive, dehydration and oxygen deprivation can cause life-long health problems, including brain damage.

 

Finding unwanted newborns is a true dilemma. What should you do if you discover a half-dozen puppies whelping and wriggling beneath your porch, for example?  Or your kids tell you there are kittens with their eyes shut in the drain pipe across the street?

 

In California, abandoning dogs and cats—even outside of a no-kill shelter—is a misdemeanor crime. So once you take them in, you should know what to do with them. If you encounteIr stray kittens or puppies, Animal Samaritans recommends you take the following steps:

 

  1. Move the infants to a cool, safe location. If you have personal pets, keep them separated, as the infants may carry diseases and parasites.
  1. Attempt to hydrate the animals by providing water in a shallow dish or cup for them. They may or may not drink it.  Do not use a deep bowl that a feeble kitten or puppy could drown in.
  1. For overheated puppies and kittens, dab their paws with rubbing alcohol to help cool their body temperatures.
  1. If possible, trap the mother so that she can continue to nurse her young after you have rescued her babies. *In many cases, however, feral dogs and cats will abandon their young if threatened or their hiding place is discovered.
  1. Decide whether or not you can bottle feed the kittens or puppies until they can eat solid food on their own, which normally occurs between 5 and 6 weeks of age. *A kitten or puppy who can feed itself is much more likely to survive life in a public shelter. Most public animal shelters do not have the staff or budgets to bottle feed infant kittens and puppies. Private animal shelters like Animal Samaritans have a limited number of staff and volunteers to care for and bottle feed infants, and often these resources are already in use—especially during kitten and puppy season, which is heaviest April through September.  Also, by law, Animal Samaritans is required to send stray dogs and cats to a public animal shelter to ensure they do not take ownership of an animal that a pet owner may be looking for. With newborn kittens and puppies, the situation becomes murky; however, there is the potential that a pet owner wants to keep all of his pet’s puppies or kittens, and legally he or she owns them.
  1. Contact your local public animal shelter for their business hours before taking a stray animal (or litter of animals) to them. For residents of Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, La Quinta, Indian Wells, Indio, Coachella, and unincorporated cities of Riverside County, call Riverside County Animal Services at 760-343-3644 or visit their website, rcdas.org. For residents of Palm Springs, contact the Palm Springs Animal Shelter at 760-416-5718.
  1. Take the stray kittens or puppies to your local animal shelter. Local public shelters will not charge you a fee to turn in a stray animal or litter of animals—this is different than surrendering a personal pet. Go inside and talk to a staff member; don’t just drop the infants off in secrecy and sneak away. Again, if the animals are weaned, their odds of becoming adopted and having a life as someone’s pet dramatically increase!

 

Animal Samaritans is a 501 c 3 non-profit organization established in 1978 to improve the lives of animals and people.  As the Desert’s leader in quality & affordable veterinary care, they run a professional, state-of-the-art veterinary clinic at the Animal Campus in Thousand Palms.  Animal Samaritans also provides free Pet Therapy to local seniors, hospital patients, and disabled children. Their bi-lingual humane education staff teaches school children throughout the Coachella Valley responsible pet ownership, animal cruelty awareness, and respect for all living creatures.  At their no-kill animal shelter, Animal Samaritans commits to its shelter dogs and cats for life. What’s more, each month Animal Samaritans rescues over 100 at-risk dogs and cats from our local public shelters through its Adoption Alliance animal rescue program.  For more information visit www.animalsamaritans.org                 ###

Animal Samaritans Makes Room for Indio’s Displaced Shelter Animals

Animal Samaritans Makes Room for Indio’s Displaced Shelter Animals

 

Thousand Palms, CA – July 12, 2013: How will the Valley’s largest public animal shelter, Riverside County Animal Services (RCAS), find enough kennels and cages for the influx of dogs and cats coming from Indio’s now-defunct animal shelter?  What happens to the animals already there, waiting day in and day out, adoptable but not yet adopted?

 

Since the announced closure on Indio’s Animal Shelter in early June, Animal Samaritans has been working with RCAS to double their ongoing efforts to rescue animals.  They even hired a  second Adoptions Alliance Rescue staff member to save more lives, Jennifer Uberti, a certified veterinary assistant and long-time animal rescuer.

 

Animal Samaritans applauds the rescue efforts of fellow animal rescuers Loving All Animals to help find homes for Indio’s displaced shelter animals, and is proud to be working behind-the-scenes with all animal welfare organization involved to make

 

“They’ve stepped up to the front lines to help Indio’s animals,” notes Animal Samaritans’ Animal Rescuer, Michelle Bergeron. “But there are still lots of animals from Indio coming into Riverside County Shelter, and we know those animals need kennels and cages. That means rescuing more animals now, quickly, to make room for them.”

 

According to RCAS [title] Frank Corvino, the Desert’s largest public animal shelter has taken in ?? dogs and cats from the Indio Shelter since the migration of animals began on July 1.

 

“[quote from Corvino]”

 

During those same two weeks, Animal Samaritans has partnered with RCAS to rescue 65 adoptable animals—again, making space for the tide of dogs and cats coming from Indio. To compound rescue efforts, Bergeron and Uberti have seen a surge in abandoned kittens and puppies this month.

 

“We’re still on the tail end of kitten season,” explains Bergeron.  “And in the desert, puppy season is practically year round.”

 

Unweened, orphaned kittens and puppies are particularly vulnerable in public shelters, as they require around the clock bottle feeding. To help save these young lives, Animal Samaritans will hold its next pet foster orientation class Wednesday, August 7 at 3:30pm, at their no-kill animal shelter in Thousand Palms: 72307 Ramon Road. Animal Samaritans Volunteer Coordinator Leslie Cyphers will field pet fostering questions and present an overview on what pet foster parents can expect to encounter while fostering dogs, cats, puppies and kittens.

 

To reserve a spot in Animal Samaritans’ free Pet Foster Orientation Class, contact Leslie at 760-396-7313

 

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, low-cost and no-cost spay and neuter, low-cost vaccinations, animal sheltering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Animal Assisted Therapy programs visit disabled children in special needs classrooms, nursing homes, and hospitals, while their Animal Assisted Activities teams see residents at Juvenile Hall.  www.animalsamaritans.org

 

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Therapy Dogs Sent to Soothe Students

Therapy Dogs Sent to Soothe Students

 

Thousand Palms, CA – June 4, 2013: Animal Samaritans is pleased to help the students of Marywood-Palm Valley School lower their blood pressure, strengthen their immune systems, and most importantly, reduce their stress levels during final exams week. Volunteers with Animal Samaritans’ Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) program will bring their dogs to the Marywood campus in Rancho Mirage to allow students to pet and interact with nature’s natural soothers prior to taking their final exams.  The AAT visits are scheduled from 8am to 10:15am the following days, with the following Animal Samaritans’ AAT program team members:

 

Wednesday, June 5:   Suzy Walker and Charlie  (Cavalier King Charles spaniel)
Anne Leiboh and Harley (black lab mix)
Sherri Halstead and Elvira (standard poodle)

Thursday, June 6:       Marcy Blumstein and Oliver (akita)
Betty Kerr and Dakota (shar pei mix)
Doris Scott and Crosby (labradoodle)

Friday, June 7:           Mary Danielle and Jack (German shorthair mix)
Estelle Dahl and Pinkie (doberman)
Sherri Halstead and Elvira (standard poodle)

 

For more than a decade, Animal Samaritans AAT program has been providing free animal therapy visits to local hospital patients, residents at local nursing homes and assisted living facilities, students in special needs classrooms, and incarcerated youth at Juvenile Hall. The therapy animals, which have included the occasional therapy cat, also visit abused and abandoned children at Father’s Heart Ranch and Shelter from the Storm.  Bringing therapy pets to University campuses to relieve students’ stress is a growing trend. So why not do the same for our high-schoolers?

 

Barbara Klein, a community service organizer at Marywood-Palm Valley, animal rescuer, and supporter of Animal Samaritans, initiated the visits.  The year prior, she organized a group of Marywood students to create dog walking paths next to Animal Samaritans’ no-kill animal shelter in Thousand Palms.  After the seasonal spring winds, Animal Samaritans is ready for the students to return and transform the lot next door from a vacant sand lot to doggy walk central.

 

Prior to admission into the AAT program, potential therapy dogs must receive their Canine Good Citizen certificates through the American Kennel Club.  Next, the dogs must pass AnSams’ temperament test to ensure they are suitable for the AAT program. Potential AAT dogs are tested in over 16 specific areas. These include: walking well on a loose leash, obedience around other dogs, calm reactions to startling noises, and tolerance to rough handling, such as fur grabbing and ear tugging.

 

Ideal AAT animals are smart, accepting of strangers, non-aggressive toward other dogs, and have an innate desire to work. The program is free; however, pet owners pay a nominal fee for their animal’s therapy vests, and all AAT volunteers must become members of Animal Samaritans SPCA. To learn more about the program, pet owners are encouraged to call Animal Samaritans Volunteer Coordinator at 760-396-7313.

 

About Marywood-Palm Valley School

Marywood-Palm Valley School, in Rancho Mirage, California, is the only independent private school in the Coachella Valley, serving preschool through high school.  100% of graduates qualify for four-year colleges.  School class sizes average 15 – 20 students and 50% of the 62 teachers hold advanced degrees. The school is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and the California Association of Independent Schools, and is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the California Scholarship Federation, the National Association of College Admissions Counselors and the College Board.

 

The Marywood-Palm Valley School develops intellectual abilities through a passion for learning and critical thinking as well as inspires individual courage, respect, and tolerance. Known to foster integrity, compassion, and responsibility, MWPV nurtures imagination, creative expression and a sense of humor while encouraging a balanced perspective on life through healthy decision-making and personal fitness. For more information visit www.MWPV.org or call 760.328.0861

 

About Animal Samaritans

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, low-cost and no-cost spay and neuter, low-cost vaccinations, animal sheltering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Animal Assisted Therapy programs visit disabled children in special needs classrooms, nursing homes, and hospitals, while their Animal Assisted Activities teams see residents at Juvenile Hall.  www.animalsamaritans.org

 

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Increased Signs of Dog Fighting Surface in Our Desert Community

Increased Signs of Dog Fighting Surface in Our Desert Community

 

Thousand Palms, CA – March 15, 2013: The larger dog always fought to kill, while Capone, with his docile disposition and his muzzle taped shut, would simply fight to stay alive. Time and again, the sweet-natured pit but was mauled by fight dogs. When his owner finally deemed the two-year-old bait dog useless, someone tried to destroy Capone with a final coup de grâce. Doctors suspect the gash to his head was caused by a machete or axe. Whatever the weapon, the blow was clearly intended to kill him; amazingly, it didn’t.

 

Michelle Bergeron, Animal Samaritans’ Adoption Alliance Animal Rescue Coordinator, had never seen a dog so terribly abused.

 

Bite marks—infected and oozing—marred the young dog’s chest, face and neck. His ribs protruded like a picket fence. An infestation of fleas and ticks had colonized beneath his fur. And in his digestive track, doctors found evidence of further neglect: a goat-like diet of buttons, plastic bags, and small balloons.

 

On February 26, Animal Control officers responded to a call about an injured dog wandering the desert near the city of Coachella.  A dog in Capone’s condition—visibly suffering, expensive to fix, and uncertain to recover—is typically euthanized; there are just too many healthy animals with better odds of being adopted, and only so many kennels.

 

Bergeron was skeptical when she went to the pound to meet Capone, expecting he would be too aggressive or timid to rehabilitate. As she locked eyes with the abused dog, he lifted his head and immediately wagged his tail.  She entered his kennel, knelt beside him, and the abused dog began to shower her with kisses.

 

“There was something extra special about this one,” recalls Bergeron. “It’s like God sent an angel to teach us all to be better humans.”

 

Despite being starved, tethered, beaten, and served as sport to fight dogs, Capone retains a genuine sweetness and love for people—personality flaws in the eyes of a dog fighter.

 

Just as dog fighters cull the most aggressive “alpha” puppies from a litter to be the fighters, they target submissive, gentle puppies to be their fight dog’s bait. Of course, bait dogs never stand a fair chance of defending themselves.

 

While dog fighters typically neglect and underfeed bait dogs, they commonly inject their fight dogs with steroids to boost size, strength and aggression.  Equally inhumane, they often clip a bait dog’s nails and extract or file down its teeth to keep it from properly fighting back. Fighters also crop their fight dog’s ears and dock their tails to decrease the areas canine competitors can grab onto, and to reduce the physical cues of aggression, or body language, that dogs instinctively read.

 

Over the past three months, Bergeron has seen an increase in dogs with signs of abuse, the kind suffered by Capone, which are indicative of animals enslaved in the vicious sub-culture of dog fighting.

 

Dog fighting is a felony offense in all 50 states, with punishments ranging per state. California carries one of the stiffest penalties: a maximum 5 years in prison and $50,000 in fines for organizing or participating in the illegal blood sport. It is also considered a felony to own a fight dog in California, and spectators at an organized fight can be cited with a misdemeanor offense.

 

If you suspect a dog is being abused as either a bait dog or a fight dog, contact the Coachella Valley branch of Riverside County Animal Services (RCAS) at 760-343-3644. While Animal Samaritans works closely with RCAS, the non-profit organization does not employ animal control officers who handle criminal matters.

 

So where is Capone now? In late February, Animal Samaritans transported Capone to It’s the Pits animal rescue in San Diego, where he continues to receive medical care and hands on socializing. While he still has a tough climb to recovery, staff members at Animal Samaritans eagerly await Capone’s official medical clearance, and plan to make a road trip to San Diego for his adoption day debut.

 

Animal Samaritans’ Adoption Alliance animal rescue program relies on donations to function. Without continued contributions, their life-saving work would not be possible. For more information on The Adoption Alliance Program and how to make a difference in the lives of animals, call 760-601-3756.

 

Animal Samaritans is a 501 c 3 non-profit organization established in 1978 to improve the lives of animals and people.  As the Desert’s leader in quality & affordable veterinary care, they run a professional, state-of-the-art veterinary clinic at the Animal Campus in Thousand Palms.  Animal Samaritans also provides free Pet Therapy to local seniors, hospital patients, and disabled children. Their bi-lingual humane education staff teaches school children throughout the Coachella Valley responsible pet ownership, animal cruelty awareness, and respect for all living creatures.  At their no-kill animal shelter, Animal Samaritans commits to its shelter dogs and cats for life. What’s more, each month Animal Samaritans rescues over 100 at-risk dogs and cats from our local public shelters through its Adoption Alliance animal rescue program.  For more information visit www.animalsamaritans.org

 

 

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AnSams Rescues 2,000th Homeless Animal

AnSams Rescues 2,000th Homeless Animal

Thousand Palms, CA – Wednesday, September 05, 2012: A shaggy, salt and pepper colored terrier mix with an injured leg became the 2,000th animal rescued by Animal Samaritans’ Adoption Alliance program. Animal Samaritans met Pet Orphans of Southern California, an animal rescue group based in Van Nuys, California, at the Riverside County Animal Shelter, Tuesday afternoon around 1pm. Jeff Brady and Jody Davidson of Pet Orphans were excited to be part of AnSams’ 2,000th rescue milestone.

The rescue event included 5 cats and 11 dogs. Three of the dogs, including the 2000th rescue, were injured. One was a pointer mix with trauma to the head who will have one of his eyes removed. Such an injury is commonly a death sentence for pets at a public shelter, as public shelters rarely have the medical staff or financial resources to care for and rehabilitate such animals.

“We hold up to fifty dogs and cats at a time in our private shelter,” said animal rescuer Jeff Brady. “We often take the less desirables and hard to place animals too, those more likely to be put down. We work with them, fix them up, and find them new homes.”

Animal Samaritans’ private no-kill animal shelter has been adopting animals from RCAS for years, but through the Adoption Alliance program they now also rescue animals and place them in safe havens throughout the U.S. and Canada.

“We love this partnership because we know it results in lives saved,” Animal Services Director Robert Miller said. “We are very fortunate that several of our city contract partners have made commitments to keep this program going strong. Saving as many pets’ lives is what we’re all committed to—and this Adoption Alliance is a great illustration of that.”

Animal Samaritans Adoption Alliance Rescue Coordinator, Michelle Bergeron, works in tandem with staff from RCAS to access, test, and pull animals for rescue. Both organizations share a common goal: reduce animal euthanasia rates and save more lives. Bergeron’s position is partially funded by contributions from the cities of Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage, but the amount is not enough to cover her salary, nor the expense of gas spent on transporting animals to rescue groups throughout California and to major airports, from which animals are flown as far east as Florida and as far north as Calgary, Canada.

“Two thousand discarded animals have been saved through the Adoption Alliance, and we can and will save more,” said Animal Samaritans’ Executive Director Fred Saunders. “The Adoption Alliance program needs your help in saving animals with donations, and volunteer assistance, including pet fostering, to continue in the future.”

Animal Samaritans relies on charitable contributions to underwrite its many community outreach programs, such as Humane Education in our local schools, emergency veterinary care for low-income seniors, and the feeding and care for animals at their own no-kill animal shelter. Animal Samaritans is currently seeking donations earmarked for The Adoption Alliance to ensure the program continues to thrive in 2013, and thousands more animals will be saved next year.

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760-343-4908 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org ###

Animal Samaritans Rescues Puppies Found By Police

Animal Samaritans Rescues Puppies Found By Police

Thousand Palms, CA – July 2, 2012: In Cathedral City, thermometers peaked at 109 degrees the first day in July. That night, Cathedral City police officer Alberto Ochoa discovered a box of dehydrated puppies in the desert. He followed the sound of whimpers and cries before shining his flashlight on the source. There were seven puppies in all, four living, three dead.

Under California law, penal code 597, the broad legal definition of animal abuse / animal cruelty is the occurrence of intentional physical abuse or neglect when an animal is deprived of food, water, shelter, or veterinary services. Clearly, leaving a box full of puppies or kittens vulnerable to the summer heat without provision for space to move, food, or water can be viewed as abuse by neglect, or just plain cruelty—a felony.

What is the punishment for animal abuse in California? Each case is different. If convicted under lesser extremes as a misdemeanor, the guilty party can be fined $20,000 and receive a one-year jail sentence. If convicted of felony animal abuse, a judge can fine perpetrators $20,000 and incarcerate them for up to three years.

The Cathedral City police turned the surviving puppies over to The Riverside County/Cities Animal Shelter (aka the pound) at around 1pm on July 2, knowing that Animal Samaritans had already committed to rescuing them.

“When I heard about the puppies, I immediately told our friends at the pound we’d take them,” said Michelle Bergeron, Animal Samaritans’ Adoption Alliance Animal Rescue Coordinator. Because Animal Samaritans did not have immediate space for the puppies at their no-kill animal shelter on Ramon Road, Bergeron began making phone calls. It wasn’t long before she connected with Save-A-Pet in Desert Hot Springs, who agreed to take them.

Animal Samaritans works with more than 100 fellow no-kill animal shelters and rescue groups throughout North America. They routinely partner with local animal organizations such as Save-A-Pet, Yaps, Living Free, Loving All Animals, and Humane Society of the Desert to rescue adoptable dogs and cats from our public shelters.

The four surviving puppies found by Cathedral City police officer Alberto Ochoa will be cared for at Save-A-Pet. Once they have grown large enough to be spayed and neutered, they will be fixed, microchipped, vaccinated and made available for adoption.

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place Contact: Tom Snyder 760.343.4908 tsnyder@animalsamaritans.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760-343-4908 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org. Save A Pet is a 501 (c) (3) non s. ###

How to Protect Your Pets from Coyotes

How to Protect Your Pets from Coyotes

Thousand Palms, CA – June 21, 2012: Summer is officially here, and summer heat and dryness means less food and water for our desert’s predatory animals. Not surprisingly, we often see more coyotes in our parks, neighborhoods, backyards, and golf courses this time of year.

It’s not that coyotes crave schnauzers and calicos; it’s that they’re hungry and resourceful and pets are a plentiful food source. What’s worse, by giving our dogs and cats a safe, stress-free life, we have somewhat desensitized them to being natural prey. In short, our pets are less attuned than non-domesticated animals to the dangers lurking in the bushes. What’s their best line of defense against coyotes? Us. By following a few precautionary tips this summer, we can almost guarantee our pets will be safe from coyotes:

  1. Never feed a coyote. It’s better to keep coyotes scared and away from you than to befriend them. Feeding coyotes won’t keep them from stalking your pets; on the contrary, it can give coyotes the bravado to boldly go where they haven’t gone before–like into your backyard or through the doggy door.
  2. Don’t leave pet food in the yard. If coyotes smell and discover your pets’ food bowls, they’ll help themselves and be back for more. Instead, feed your dogs and cats inside. Also, keep fallen fruit (like tangerines and grapefruit) off the ground and out of the yard, as it can also attract resourceful predators. Finally, keep a tight lid on your trash cans, and never leave trash bags accessible to four-legged scavengers.
  3. Keep your pets indoors from dusk to dawn. If your pets need to go outside for exercise and potty breaks in the evenings, keep them on a leash. Cat owners, if your kitty won’t wear a harness, (and most cat owners haven’t leash trained their cats) keep her close by. Coyotes are much faster than we are, even while running with prey in their mouths.
  4. Enclose your back yard with a wall or fence. Make it at least six feet high, and because coyotes instinctively dig, install a vinyl lattice or chicken wire 2 to 3 feet underground. This should stop a determined coyote from tunneling in.
  5. If you walk your pets at night, keep them on a leash. This is especially important if you walk them along golf courses and desert chaparral.
  6. Finally, to help guard your smaller pets adopt a large dog from a local animal shelter, like a German shepherd, Rottweiler, or mastiff. Okay, so this might be a blatant plea to adopt from a local animal shelter–but the big ones will protect the little ones!

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760-343-4908 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org ###

Mini-Panthers for Adoption at the Westfield Mall

Mini-Panthers for Adoption at the Westfield Mall

Thousand Palms, CA – June 5, 2012: This Saturday, June 9, Animal Samaritans is bringing several adoptable dogs and six mini-panthers to the Westfield Mall. The pet adoption event will take place on the mall’s first floor, outside the Sears department store, from 10am to 2pm.

While sleek, elegant, loving and intelligent, black felines are routinely overlooked by potential adopters. Animal Samaritans has dubbed their black kittens mini-panthers for the obvious resemblance to their majestic cousins in the wild.

Novice cat lovers are easily lured by the multi-colored tabbies, tortoise shells, and calicos, however black cats are arguably the more passionate and practical choice for adoption.

Why adopt a mini-panther?

  • Black is elegant and always in vogue
  • Your mini-panther will look swanky lounging on any chair, bed, sofa or floor in the house
  • You can “jungle-theme” her food bowl, toys, and litter box
  • You can be a hero; on average, black cats stay longer in shelters than any other colored cats
  • She will love you unconditionally

Adopting your own mini-panther is much safer than adopting a real panther. Unlike their larger, undomesticated relatives, mini-panthers prefer Friskies and Iams to fresh python, warthog, and goat meat. You can give your mini-panther a hip, leopard-pattern collar too, which is much better than being collared by a big black leopard. And when you cuddle and snuggle with your affectionate little mini-panther, she’ll be purring because she loves you—not because she’s gnawing on your carcass.

Before adopting your mini-panther, be sure you’ve picked out a quiet place for her litter box, preferably in a room or corner with minimal foot traffic. Budget for quality cat food (which will keep her coat full and shiny), routine pet vaccinations, and annual health exams. If possible, plan to make your mini-panther an indoor cat; indoor felines have less exposure to contagious diseases, predators, traffic, and on average, live several years longer than cats who roam.

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760-343-4908 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org ###

Cool Teen Works to Keep Animals Cool

Cool Teen Works to Keep Animals Cool

Thousand Palms, CA – May 10, 2012: Jake Freedman, a 15-year-old student from Palm Desert High School, will soon join an exclusive group of highly driven individuals that includes Astronaut Neil Armstrong, director Steven Spielberg, and former President Gerald R. Ford: America’s Eagle Scouts.

Freedman is currently a Life Scout, the second-highest ranking achievable. Before he advances to Eagle Scout, a distinction achieved by only 2% of all Scouts according to Freedman, the high school freshmen must “plan, develop and give leadership to others in a service project” to a local church, school, or our desert community. Freedman, who has two dogs and two cats at home, will be helping the community by helping Animal Samaritans.

“I spoke to Leslie [Cyphers], your volunteer coordinator,” said Freedman. “I told her I wanted a project that would help the animals, and together we found one.” That project is to improve the outside dog kennels at Animal Samaritans’ no-kill animal shelter in Thousand Palms.

Freedman will be leading 10 to 15 fellow scouts from Troop 707 in the project. He and his team will replace the kennels’ torn and weathered shade tarps with new, commercial grade cloth that will keep the dogs cool while protecting them from the sun’s intense UV rays. In addition, Freedman and his crew will repair the kennel area’s misting system, which has not functioned properly in years. The project is appropriately timed to help cool the dogs and allow them more time outside during the coming summer months.

Freedman and his fellow scouts will be at Animal Samaritans shelter (72-307 Ramon Road) on Friday, May 18, to tear down and clear out the dog kennel tarps and assess the cooling system. The following Saturday Morning, May 19, they will work to replace the kennel shading and fix the misters. In addition to providing his vision, manual labor, and leadership to the project, Freedman must also raise funds to pay for project materials, which he estimates will cost around $1,200.

Fred Saunders, Executive Director for Animal Samaritans’ was impressed by Freedman’s maturity and purpose. “It is refreshing to know responsible and caring young people like this one,” said Saunders.

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760-343-4908 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org ###

Desert Charities Team Up for Important Causes

Desert Charities Team Up for Important Causes

Thousand Palms, CA – April 3, 2012: Animal Samaritans SPCA and The Inland Empire Chapter of The United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) have teamed up to raise money for two important causes: children in need, and animals in need. The local UCP chapter operates out of Cathedral City, while Animals Samaritans runs its full-service veterinary center and no-kill animal shelter in Thousand Palms.

The organizations will hold a joint charity luncheon, “Paws for a Cause,” on Sunday, April 15, at the Rancho Las Palmas Resort in Rancho Mirage. KPSP TV 2 news anchor Kris Long will host. The event starts at 11am with complimentary champagne and hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction, and no host bar. The event continues with a delicious buffet brunch, live auction, and music from the Palm Springs High Orchestra program.

Guests can bid on a two-night stay at the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort in Indian Wells, a Day of Beauty & Night of Romance package, featuring salon time and dinner, and a stay at Rancho Las Palmas Resort in Rancho Mirage.

Children from UCP will be in attendance, along with dogs from Animal Samaritans’ Animal Assisted Therapy program.

“Watching the kids interact with the dogs is a joy to see,” notes Animal Samaritans Executive Director Fred Saunders.

“Having therapy dogs come out to visit our children is a very special time for our special needs children,” said Greg Wetmore, President and CEO of UCPIE.

Animal Samaritans’ Animal Assisted Therapy program brings certified therapy dogs to local hospital patients, nursing home residents, and disabled children throughout our desert communities. While known primarily as an animal welfare organization, Animal Samaritans’ mission statement is to “improve the lives of animals and people,” which they have been doing since 1978 through programs aimed at helping low-income and senior pet owners, through their humane education in the classroom program, and through their Animals Assisted Therapy program.

The mission of UCP is to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities. Their programs and services are offered at no cost to families that are qualified through the Inland Regional Center. Our local UCP provides these services to people with various developmental disabilities, including mental retardation, cerebral palsy, autism, Down’s syndrome, ADHD, Asperger’s syndrome, along with other special needs.

Tickets for “Paws for a Cause” are $85. Please contact Greg Wetmore at 760.321.8184 x103, or greg@ucpie.org to reserve a seat today!

Desert’s Largest Animal Walk Set for March 31

Desert’s Largest Animal Walk Set for March 31

Thousand Palms, CA – March 13, 2012: Animal Samaritans SPCA will hold its 12th annual Walk for the Animals on Saturday, March 31, at the Palm Desert Civic Park. Roughly 500 pet owners attend each year, most with their human and canine family members. The event raises money for the care of Animal Samaritans’ homeless shelter animals, and its Humane Education program, which provides free, state-approved education to local school children about animal behavior, dog bite prevention, recognizing and reporting animal cruelty, responsible pet ownership, and respect for all living creatures.

Now is the time to form Animal Walk teams! Interested animal lovers can download a walk pledge form on the Events & Program’s page at www.animalsamaritans.org. While the event is free, donations and walk pledges are needed. Attendees who raise $25 dollars or more will receive an Animal Samaritans T-shirt and goody bag. Animal Samaritans also plans to raise money through the sale of raffle tickets for prizes that include a deluxe pet basket, a 32” Phillips Flat Screen TV, and a new bicycle.

Registration for the Walk begins at 8am and the event will begins at 9am. Guests may help themselves to complimentary coffee, juice, and continental breakfast items. Prior to the Dog Walk, which includes a 1 ½ mile and a ¾ mile walk route, there will be a Blessing of the Animals Ceremony.

Following the Walk, pet owners can enjoy a police K-9 dog demonstration, the acrobatics of trained Frisbee and agility dogs, a horseback search and rescue demonstration, and the always popular pet costume contest. There will be animal-related and kid-related vendors on cite, and children can enjoy a petting zoo with goats, sheep, and rabbits.

Walk for the Animals is a great opportunity for animal lovers to adopt a new four-legged family member. As in years past, Animal Samaritans has invited fellow animal shelters to bring adoptable dogs to the event to participate in the 2nd Chance Parade of Pets.

Animal Samaritans’ clinic staff will be at the event offering pet vaccinations and pet microcipping. Cat owners must bring their felines in a pet carrier, and all dogs must either be in a carrier or on a leash. Vaccinations cost between $15 and $20; pet microchipping is $25.

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, low-cost and no-cost spay and neuter, low-cost vaccinations, low-cost dental care and pet wellness exams, microchipping, animal sheltering and pet adoptions. In addition, nearly one hundred volunteers from their Animal Assisted Therapy programs visit disabled children in special needs classrooms, nursing homes, and hospitals, while their Animal Assisted Activities teams see residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760-343-4908 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org. ###

AnSams Holds Free Pet Vaccination Clinic for East Valley Residents

AnSams Holds Free Pet Vaccination Clinic for East Valley Residents

Thousand Palms, CA – March 1, 2012: Thanks to a generous grant from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), Animal Samaritans will provide a free pet vaccination clinic to pet owners of the Eastern Coachella Valley. Pet owners residing in the cities of Indio, Coachella, Thermal, Mecca, Oasis, and North Shore are encouraged to attend Animal Samaritans’ free pet vaccination clinic on Saturday, March 10, from 8am to 2pm, at Veterans Park in Coachella.

The free pet vaccination clinic includes rabies and DHPP shots for dogs, and rabies, FELV and FVCRP shots for cats. The DHPP shot for dogs protects canines from Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, and the Parvovirus, which is not only lethal, but also quite contagious and prevalent in our Coachella Valley. The FELV vaccine for cats inoculates felines against Feline Leukemia, while the FVCRP vaccine is known as the Feline Distemper Shot. Animal Samaritans’ staff members will administer up to 1,285 canine vaccines and 200 feline vaccines at no cost to East Valley residents.

For puppy and kitten owners, Animal Samaritans will also hand out certificates for free puppy and kitten booster shots; unvaccinated puppies and kittens require a series of 2 or 3 shots (depending on the vaccine) for the animal to be protected by the vaccines.

Vaccinations will be given on a first-come, first-served priority. Animal Samaritans requires pet owner to bring their dogs on a leash and their cats in a pet carrier; small dogs may also be transported in a pet carrier.

Pet medical records are helpful, but not required. For more information, contact Animal Samaritans at 760-343-4271.

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people. As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals. Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions. In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760-343-4908 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org ###

Animal Samaritans Offers Free Summer Camps to Local Children

Animal Samaritans Offers Free Summer Camps to Local Children

 

Thousand Palms, CA – July 30, 2013: This August, Animal Samaritans will offer two free mini-Critter Camps for children residing in Oasis and Mecca.  The first grant-funded mini Critter Camp will be held in Oasis on August 12 and 13 from 9:30am – 1:30pm at the Mountain View Estates, where families from the infamously impoverished Duroville Trailer Park were relocated after the park was shut down in late June.

 

Animal Samaritans will put on a second, three day mini-Critter Camp for children residing in Mecca. The grant-funded mini Critter Camp will be held August 19, 20, and 21 from 9am to 1pm at the Mecca County Health Clinic.  Both camps are open to children ages 5 to 11.

 

Animal Samaritans’ bi-lingual Humane Education staff, Diana Martinez and Carla Rodriguez, and several volunteers will provide kids with a hands-on, interactive encounter with reptiles (snakes and lizards), rodents (guinea pigs and rats), and certified therapy dogs from the organization’s popular Animal Assisted Therapy Program.  Animal Samaritans will provide lunch for the children, as well as materials for building animal-themed arts and crafts.  In addition to handling live animals, creating art projects, and playing games, campers learn the basic tenants for responsible pet ownership and respect for all living creatures.

 

The organizations’ week-long Summer Camps filled to capacity within just two weeks of announcing it, many with children returning from last years’ camps.  Parents evaluations of Animal Samaritans’ Critter Camps have once again been glowing.

 

Parents Olga and Julio Alexander from Thousand Palms wrote: “Thank you so much for another wonderful year J Mia and Mark enjoyed camp so much & had so many things to tell us about each day. We really appreciate all of the hard work you guys do to make it such a wonderful experience for the kids. They brought so many wonderful crafts home each day. I would highly recommend this camp to all of our friends.”

 

And Palm Springs’ mom Gorgie Lombardo wrote: “Critter Camp is one of the most…entertaining and animal-educating camps ever. The fun crafts they make every day are the cutest—great ideas—and the staff is fantastic. We WILL keep coming back year after year. So save us a spot and add some more weeks….”

 

Parents residing in the communities of Mecca and Oasis who are interested in sending their youngsters to a free summer mini-Critter Camp are encouraged to contact Diana Martinez at Animal Samaritans: 760-601-3761. Space is limited to 25 children.

 

Animal Samaritans is a 501 c 3 non-profit organization established in 1978 to improve the lives of animals and people.  As the Desert’s leader in quality & affordable veterinary care, they run a professional, state-of-the-art veterinary clinic at the Animal Campus in Thousand Palms.  Animal Samaritans also provides free Pet Therapy to local seniors, hospital patients, and disabled children. Their bi-lingual humane education staff teaches school children throughout the Coachella Valley responsible pet ownership, animal cruelty awareness, and respect for all living creatures.  At their no-kill animal shelter, Animal Samaritans commits to its shelter dogs and cats for life. What’s more, each month Animal Samaritans rescues over 100 at-risk dogs and cats from our local public shelters through its Adoption Alliance animal rescue program.  For more information visit www.animalsamaritans.org

 

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Coachella Valley Brewery Opens Doors Early to Support Local Charity

Coachella Valley Brewery Opens Doors Early to Support Local Charity

 

Thousand Palms, CA – August 14, 2013: Until this week, the massive, metallic High Efficiency Brewing System (HEBS), was still a virgin. Except for a lone shelf displaying several brewing trophies, the wood-paneled walls of the tasting room are bare, and the row of beer taps remains unlabeled.

 

The Coachella Valley Brewing Company in Thousand Palms has yet to open its doors for business, but this month the Desert’s new specialty “brew-ologists” will support Animal Samaritans’ SPCA by offering a private beer tasting. Pet lovers interested in finding out about Animal Samaritans’ 13th annual Walk for the Animals & Pet Expo and being among the first to taste the brewery’s original hand-crafted beers are invited to attend one of two beer tastings.   The brewery is located at 30-640 Gunther Street in Thousand Palms, just around the corner from Animal Samaritan’s veterinary clinic, and will offer tastings from 4:00pm to 6:00pm, and 6:30pm to 8:30pm on Thursday, August 22.

 

Staff members from Animal Samaritans will be on site to answer questions and inspire participation in the nonprofit’s annual Animal Walk & Pet Expo fundraiser, happening November 9th at the Palm Springs’ Pavilion event center at Sunrise Park.  Each tasting is limited to 40 people, and all guests must register through Animal Samaritans to attend.  To register, call 760-601-3755 or email Elke Naumann at enaumann@animalsamaritans.org.

 

Attendees not on the reservation list may be turned away. While this is clearly an event geared for pet lovers, guests are asked to leave their four-legged children at home. And, of course, all two-legged animals in attendance must be 21 years of age or older.

 

“Our brewing is based on the Belgium farm house philosophy of integrating the local agriculture into our beers,” explains Chris Anderson, Head Brewer and Chief Operations Officer for Coachella Valley Brewing Company. “It’s a farm to glass ideology.”

 

Anderson, who is also a certified chef, has plans–and recipes– for producing 25 distinct beers during the brewery’s inaugural year.  These include the aptly named “Kolschella” golden ale (say Coachella with a German accent), the “Dubble Date,” made with locally-grown dates, and the “Desert Swarm,” a tip of the hat to our military flavored with locally harvested honey, kumquats, and coriander herbs.

 

Jamie Humphrey, the brewery’s Spokesperson and wife of CEO David Humphrey, boasts that HEBS, their impressive brewing system, is only the 5th of its kind in operation. With such state-of-the-art machinery, the company sought a fiscally judicious location to headquarter their operations.

“We located here in Thousand Palms,” she says, “to be in the Enterprise Zone and take advantage of the program’s tax breaks and purchasing incentives for new businesses.”

 

Humphrey makes clear that their Brewing Company is not a pub or sports bar; they don’t serve food, they don’t show games, and they don’t have happy hour: their aim is to translate their creativity and passion for beer into product that lines the shelves of local markets and appears on the menus of local restaurants. Step two? Expand from there.

 

Jamie’s dog Matilda, a lovable keg-shaped English bulldog, is the company’s “Brew Dog.”  The four-year old pooch is a testament to the staff’s love of animals.  All five members of the brew crew have pets, most of them dogs, which is no surprise given  the brewery’s support for Animal Samaritans.

 

Animal Samaritans is grateful to The Coachella Valley Brewing Company for hosting their August 22 beer tasting event on its behalf, and encourages all interested animal (and beer) lovers to reserve their place now before space fills up.

 

Animal Samaritans is a 501 c 3 non-profit organization established in 1978 to improve the lives of animals and people.  As the Desert’s leader in quality & affordable veterinary care, they run a professional, state-of-the-art veterinary clinic at the Animal Campus in Thousand Palms.  Animal Samaritans also provides free Pet Therapy to local seniors, hospital patients, and disabled children. Their bi-lingual humane education staff teaches school children throughout the Coachella Valley responsible pet ownership, animal cruelty awareness, and respect for all living creatures.  At their no-kill animal shelter, Animal Samaritans commits to its shelter dogs and cats for life. What’s more, each month Animal Samaritans rescues over 100 at-risk dogs and cats from our local public shelters through its Adoption Alliance animal rescue program.  For more information visit www.animalsamaritans.org

 

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Animal Samaritans Helps Pet Owners Comply with New Pit Bull Spay/Neuter Mandate

Animal Samaritans Helps Pet Owners Comply with

New Pit Bull Spay/Neuter Mandate

 

Thousand Palms, CA – October 11, 2013: Animal Samaritans is helping Coachella Valley pet owners comply with the approaching mandatory Spay/Neuter law for pit bull owners residing in the unincorporated areas of Riverside County. Riverside County Animal Services’ Senior Public Information Specialist, John Welsh, says the law will take effect on or near November 7.

 

To assist local pit bull owners, Animal Samaritans is temporarily reducing its spay/neuter fees for pit bulls and pit bull mixes (that are clearly part pit bull) to just $55.   Animal Samaritans’ standard spay/neuter fees for dogs are: $95 for dogs weighing less than fifty pounds, $105 for dogs weighing between fifty and one hundred pounds, and $135 for dogs weighing more than one hundred pounds.  Adult pit bulls can weigh anywhere between fifty and one hundred fifty pounds.

 

While Animal Samaritans did not participate in or influence the recent legislation passed on mandatory spaying and neutering for pit bulls and pit bull mixes, Fred Saunders, Animal Samaritans’ Executive Director, explains “our goal is to make it as affordable as possible for area pit bull owners to comply with this new law.”

 

Combined, Animal Samaritans staff of four full-time veterinarians has more than 130 years of experience caring for animals, and each year they perform more than 7,000 spay and neuter surgeries on dogs and cats, far more than any other veterinary hospital or animal welfare organization in the area.  Animal Samaritans has been working to mitigate the problem of animal overpopulation since 1978, and has made affordable pet spaying and neutering the cornerstone of their efforts.

 

Pit bull owners interested in taking advantage of Animal Samaritans’ temporarily reduced rate of $55 dollars for pit bull spaying and neutering may schedule an appointment with Animal Samaritans by calling 760-343-3477 x3, or by scheduling through their website, animalsamaritans.org.

 

Animal Samaritans is a 501 c 3 non-profit organization established in 1978 to improve the lives of animals and people.  As the Desert’s leader in quality & affordable veterinary care, they run a professional, state-of-the-art veterinary clinic at the Animal Campus in Thousand Palms.  Animal Samaritans also provides free Pet Therapy to local seniors, hospital patients, and disabled children. Their bi-lingual humane education staff teaches school children throughout the Coachella Valley responsible pet ownership and respect for all living creatures.  At their no-kill animal shelter, Animal Samaritans commits to its shelter dogs and cats for life. What’s more, each month Animal Samaritans rescues over 100 at-risk dogs and cats from our local public shelters through its Adoption Alliance animal rescue program.  For more visit www.animalsamaritans.org.   ###

Puppy Love Permeates the Catwalk

Puppy Love Permeates the Catwalk

 

Thousand Palms, CA – December 18, 2013: Animal Samaritans SPCA presents the Desert’s 5th annual Men of the Desert Fashion show, featuring local models with their distinguished dogs (and puppies) ruling the catwalk. Once again, Saks Fifth Avenue will present the fashion show portion of the event, and dress the guys in the latest trends in style from their store on El Paseo Boulevard.

 

While the pairing of models and pets itself has grow somewhat trendy over the last few years, Animals Samaritans’ canine-themed fashion show still retains its original purpose: To raise awareness of their important work in animal rescuing, sheltering, adoptions, and veterinary care for unwanted and homeless pets, and to raise money to continue the organization’s broader mission to improve the lives of animals and people.

 

Specifically, the event raises money for Animal Samaritans’ no-kill animal shelter and Animal Care Fund, which provides free veterinary services to financially-strapped pet owners with animals in need of life-saving medical care.

 

Hostess Patti Gribow returns for the 5th year as the event’s Mistress of Ceremonies, and honors event honoree Ariana Savalas. The event begins with a reception and luncheon, peaks with the men’s fashion show, culminates with a live auction fundraiser, and includes performances by powerhouse singers Austin Ray, Douglas Ladnier and more!

 

What: 5th Annual Men of the Desert Fashion Show

Date: Saturday, February 22

Time: 11am – 2pm

Place: Hyatt Regency Indian Wells Resort & Spa

Tickets: $85

Contact: 760-601-3755 or www.animalsamaritans.org/events-programs to purchase online, or mail to Animal Samaritans, PO Box 513, Thousand Palms, CA 92276

 

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people.  As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals.  Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, quality and affordable veterinary services, including spay and neuter, vaccinations, and medical exams, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions.  In addition, each year more than eighty volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit children in special needs classrooms, seniors in nursing homes, and patients in local hospitals. More information is available by calling 760-601-3755 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org ###

Animal Samaritans Approaches 5,000 Rescues

Animal Samaritans Approaches 5,000 Rescues

 

Thousand Palms, CA – March 14, 2014: Before the Easter bunny hits the bunny trails and the kids come home for Spring Break, Animal Samaritans’ Adoption Alliance Program will reach an animal rescue milestone: 5,000 animals saved in less than 3 years.  Animal Samaritans, in partnership with Riverside County Animal Services (RCAS), rescues more than 150 dogs and cats every month.

 

Animal Samaritans’ private no-kill animal shelter has been rescuing animals from RCAS into its private shelter for decades, but through the Adoption Alliance program they also rescue animals and place them with more than 130 animal rescue groups and fellow no-kill animal shelters throughout the U.S. and Canada.  What’s more, the organization provides veterinary services, in some cases surgery, to adoptable animals that need medical attention before being ready for a safe haven and adoption.

 

In addition to its primary partner, RCAS, Animal Samaritans works locally to rescue animals with Animal Action League, Humane Society of the Desert, Living Free Animal Sanctuary, Loving All Animals, Morongo Basis Humane Society, Pet Place International, Save-A-Pet, and White Rock Horse Rescue.

 

What will with the 5,000th rescue be?  A terrier or a toy poodle?  A Pekinese or pug?  A black lab or golden retriever?  Maybe it will be a cat, an orange tabby or tri-colored calico. Maybe it will be a mini-horse or someone’s abandoned rabbit.  Which rescue partner will take it in? Will they be local or out-of-state?  Whatever the case, the Adoption Alliances’ 5,000th rescued animal will go to a no-kill animal shelter or pet rescue group that will keep it safe and work to adopt it into a new home.

 

“This milestone, to be reached so fast, illustrates fantastic work on the part of our next-door neighbor, Animal Samaritans,” said Robert Miller, Director of Riverside County Animal Services.

“Animal Samaritans should be proud of this accomplishment – and we’re pleased that our homeless pets from the Coachella Valley Animal Campus reap the rewards of all their hard work. They’re now in loving homes.”

 

Animal Samaritans Adoption Alliance Rescue Coordinator Michelle Bergeron and part-time rescuer Jennifer Uberti work in tandem with staff from RCAS to access, test, and pull animals for rescue.  Both organizations share a common goal: to reduce animal euthanasia rates and save more lives.

 

“Five thousand discarded animals have been saved through the Adoption Alliance, and we can and will save more,” said Animal Samaritans’ Executive Director Fred Saunders. “The Adoption Alliance program needs your help in saving animals with donations, and volunteer assistance, including pet fostering, and pet transporters–Highway Heroes as we call them–to continue in the future.”

 

Animal Samaritans relies on charitable contributions to underwrite its many community outreach programs, such as Humane Education in our local schools, emergency veterinary care for low-income seniors, and the feeding and care for animals at their own no-kill animal shelter.  Animal Samaritans is currently seeking donations earmarked for The Adoption Alliance to ensure the program continues to thrive and thousands more animals will be saved.

 

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people.  As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals.  Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions.  In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760.601.3756 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org    ###

Animal Samaritans Reaches Rescue Milestone: 5,000 Saved

Animal Samaritans Reaches Rescue Milestone: 5,000 Saved

24-Jun-2014Thousand Palms, CA – March 18, 2014: Animal Samaritans has reached a milestone in their Adoption Alliance Animal Rescue program: 5,000 adoptable dogs and cats saved in less than three years.On Tuesday, March 18, Animal Samaritans rescued more than 20 dogs from The Riverside County Animal Shelter. Rescuers from Pet Place International (PPI) then met Animal Samaritans rescue team at the pound and took them back to their rescue campus in the High Desert.

Animal Samaritans launched its Adoption Alliance Animal Rescue Program in late April 2011; since then we have saved more than 5,000 dogs, cats, kittens, and puppies in less than 3 years (along with the occasional horse, mini-horse, donkey, rabbit, turtle, snake, bird and rabbit).

When we started the program, we considered 30 to 40 animal rescues a month to be a major accomplishment. In time, our network of partners has grown to more than 130 rescue groups and fellow no-kill animal shelters across the U.S. and Canada. In 2013 we hired a second part-time staff member, Jennifer Uberti, who’s sole duty is rescuing animals; now instead of saving 30 animals a month we’re saving 150.
Rescue number 5,000 was a bashful tri-colored dachshund with floppy ears that nearly touched the ground. Despite his timid disposition, when he stuck his head out of his kennel bars, the rescuers knew that with a little hands on TLC he would make a wonderful pet for someone. Days after decompressing from life in the big shelter, and with reassurance from PPI that he was safe, the doxie has perked up and is showing what an affection pet he will make.

 

In addition to number 5,000, Animal Samaritans also rescued a shepherd mix and her nine puppies, a second German shepherd mix, a long-haired Chihuahua named Buster, a Yorkie mix named Jack who had been sitting at the public shelter for nearly a month, a terrier mix named Caddie, and many more. Several of the rescued dog are being featured for adoption at Desert area Pet Co stores.

 

Rescuing animals is a coordinated and concerted effort between Animal Samaritans, Riverside County Animal Services, and often a third animal welfare organization (whether local or out–of-state) such as Pet Place International.

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people.  As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals.  Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions.  In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760.601.3756 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org

Fifty-Four Dogs Take Freedom Flight from Palm Springs Airport

Fifty-Four Dogs Take Freedom Flight from Palm Springs Airport

24-Jun-2014Thousand Palms, CA – June 20, 2014: On Saturday, June 21 at 9:30am, fifty-four homeless Chihuahuas, terriers, dachshund mixes and shepherd mixes from The Riverside County Animal Shelter (RCAS) in Thousand Palms will board two non-commercial airplanes at Signature Airport in Palm Springs at 250 El Cielo Rd. (west of the main Palm Springs Airport) en route to their new homes in Idaho and Washington State.

 

Animal Samaritans coordinated the mass animal rescue with RCAS and the Wings of Rescue charity based in Van Nuys, California.  In just three and a half years, Wings of Rescue has flown 6,500 dogs and cats to safe havens In California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Canada. Twenty-six of the dogs will fly to Panhandle Animal Shelter in Idaho, and the other twenty-six will fly to PAWS Rescue in Washington.

 

Animal Samaritans worked aggressively over the past two weeks to coordinate the large rescue, ensuring that both animal shelters had space and the pilots from Wings of Rescue had time. Next they selected which animals would be saved, a difficult assessment process.

 

“When possible, we like to select the animals that have been sheltered the longest,” explains Animal Samaritans’ Rescue Coordinator Jennifer Uberit. “We also have to consider each animal’s size in response to what our rescue partners can house.”

 

Uberti also notes that the timing for this rescue is opportune, as it frees up shelter space that the Desert’s largest public animal shelter needs as we approach the Fourth of July weekend.  Animal Shelters across the country routinely see an influx of lost and disoriented dogs following all the holiday fireworks.

 

For rescue missions involving transportation by air, the rescuers also must be cognizant of how timid the animals are; just as some people fear air travel, flying can cause traumatic stress on fearful dogs. The rescuers also ensured the animals going north on Saturday are dog-friendly, people-friendly, and that they do not suffer from behavior problems like food aggression or people guarding.

 

Doctors at Animal Samaritans’ full-service veterinary clinic, located next door to RCAS at the Animal Campus in Thousand Palms, examined the health of all fifty-four dogs, tested them for heartworm, and ensured they were properly vaccinated.

 

In addition, someone still needed to cover the cost of jet fuel.  Animal Lover Stacie Dasinger played a key role in raising funds, along with her fellow donors Joyce Wyssen, Janeen Bahr, Steve Miller, and Andrea Avoian.

 

Each month Animal Samaritans works with the staff at RCAS to rescue between 130 and 200 dogs and cats.  They’re hoping this Saturday’s rescue of 54 animals gives them their most successful month to date.

 

Animal Samaritans SPCA, a 501 (c) non-profit organization founded in 1978, is committed to improving the lives of animals and people.  As the Coachella Valley’s most comprehensive animal welfare organization, they strive to one day eliminate the needless suffering and abuse of homeless and unwanted animals.  Programs and services in place to save the lives of healthy and treatable animals include prevention through humane education, affordable spay and neuter, vaccinations, and other veterinary care, animal sheltering, animal rescue, pet fostering and pet adoptions.  In addition, more than one hundred volunteers from their Pet Therapy programs visit special needs classrooms, nursing homes, local hospitals, and residents at Juvenile Hall. More information is available by calling 760.601.3756 and by visiting www.animalsamaritans.org

Critter Camp July 2013

Critter Camp July 2013 Photo Gallery

Critter Camp 2012 (Mecca)

Critter Camp 2012 Photo Gallery

Walk for the Animals 2012

Men of the Desert 2012

Men of the Desert 2013

Men of the Desert 2014

January 15 & 16, 2016 – Pause for a Cause (and the cause has paws)

Time:  10am – 5pm

Place:  TBD

About: Award-winning photographer Stacy Jacobs presents “Pause for a Cause” to benefit Animal Samaritans. Recieve a complimentary 15 minute portrait session and a free 5 x 7 print of your pet (dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, etc) in exchange for donating one or more bags of Kirkland dry dog food (Kirkland Adult Dog, Chicken) or a 12-case of wet canned cat food (Friskies) for Animal Samaritans shelter animals. Monetary donations also accepted.  Sessions are by appointment only.

Contact:  Sessions are by appointment only.  Call 760-678-5859 to make an appointment.  Visit Stacy Jacobs Photography at  www.stacyjacob.com

March 12, 2016 – Superheroes 5K Run / 1K Walk for the Animals

Time: TBD

Place: Rancho Mirage Community Park (formerly Whitewater Park) 71-560 San Jacinto Drive, Rancho Mirage

About: Join Animal Samaritans’ Superhero 5K Run / 1K Walk for the Animals on March 12, 2016 at the Rancho Mirage Community Park. This year we are adding the Superhero element to the event as all individuals involved in animal rescue, adoptions and welfare are superheroes. The event will feature a 5K Run, 1K Walk and a 200 meter “Hero in Training Dash” for the children ages 10 and under. Each entry will receive a superhero cape to wear during the event OR feel free to come dressed as your favorite Superhero! Following the run, there will be a Kids Korner featuring arts and crafts, and kids activities along with a petting zoo. There will be a superhero costume contest, an animal blessing, working dog activities, raffles, live music, food vendors and an opportunity to meet some adoptable animals from local shelters and rescue groups. Animal Samaritans will also hold a microchip and vaccination clinic.

Cost: 5K Runners TBD; 1K Walkers & General Guests TBD

Contact: Kim Laidlaw 760-601-3754

October 15 – “Halloween Pawty” Yappy Hour Kick Off!

  • HallowWoof dog Time: 4pm – 6pm
  •  Place:  Omni Rancho Las Palms, 41-000 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage (across from The River Mall)
  •  About: Come join us kick off our 2015 – 2016 season of Animal Samaritans’ Yappy Hour! Enjoy drinks and time with fellow dog lovers and their four-legged kids on one the Desert’s favorite outdoor patios. Dress your dog for the “Halloween Pawty” pet costume contest; the top three winners receive prizes.  Not all dogs need enter the contest, but all dogs must be on a leash.  We recommend a traditional leash with harness; retractable leashes often tangle, bind, or cut into legs with their thin cords.  Food is available from The Blue Ember Restaurant.
  • Cost: $10.00 for two drinks, with half of all proceeds going to Animal Samaritans.
  • Register: No registration needed.  Just bring your pooch, mingle and relax!

Zeus

Breed DLH
Age 6 mon
Sex male
Size Small
Color Brown Tabby
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 23-Sep-2014
My Story Hi everyone come and get me if you want the best looking cat at the shelter look no more its me ZEUS…..
Posted on 07-Mar-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

YoYo

Breed DLH
Age 11 weeks
Sex female
Size Small
Color Gray
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 15-May-2015
My Story I was all alone at the Animal Control. I had no Idea where my litter mates were or my mother. Because I was so tiny they said I couldnt go up for adoption but Animal Samaritans rescued me. I spent time growing in Foster care. Now Im ready for a new home.
Posted on 01-Jul-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Victoria

Breed DSH
Age 2 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Tabby /white
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 04-Feb-2015
My Story My name is Victoria and Im a cat. Im a special cat full of love this picture doesn’t do me justice but I have a heart shape  on my nose. I was rescued from a local Animal Control my owner put me there because they moved and didnt find a place that would let me go too. Im happy they left me now I can find the home I deserve.
Posted on 15-Apr-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Tuesday

Breed DMH
Age 2 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Calico
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 17-Feb-2015
My Story They call me Tuesday because I came to the shelter on a Tuesday. I had babies with me but only one survived. Her name is Kazootie she is looking for her forever home too. I need a home where I will have time to be myself and come to you when I want attention. Im beautiful and I know it…..
Posted on 01-Jul-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Tiger Lilly

Breed DMH
Age 2 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Grey Tabby
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 26-Aug-2013
My Story I came to Animal Samaritans and two days later had a bunch of kittens. My owners left me at the shelter and drove away. Im just happy it was a No Kill shelter. My children have grown and most are adopted a few are still waiting. I do need a home with no small children and I need Humans that are not looking for the type of cat that wants to cuddle all the time.
Posted on 02-Apr-2014
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Tator Tot

Breed Terrier Mix
Age 5 years
Sex male
Size Small
Color White/Cream
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained
Adoption Price $100
Intake Date 17-Dec-2014
My Story Hello Im Tator Tot.  I have a very long story. I was found in a trash bin and taken to Animal Control I was very sick. My hair had all fallen out and I was very bloated no one knew I was very sick. I have an illness called Cushings Disease. I need meds everyday but im a happy little kid I just need a home. If you want to adopt me I love to ride around in a stroller Im not one for big long walks as I have a bone missing from my front leg. Thats all part of my illness. Please someone love me ….
Posted on 15-Apr-2015
Contact Info Michelle

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Tag and Flannagan

Breed DSH
Age 3 years
Sex male
Size Small
Color Tabbys
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $50
Intake Date 20-Jun-2012
My Story We came in together and we only stay up this tree together. We need to be adopted together. We are not the cuddly kind but we still need a home. You can adopt us both for $50 so we dont have to live as orphans any more. We are brothers Tag is my name Im the brown tabby and Flannagan is Orange.
Posted on 01-Jul-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Sunny

Breed DSH
Age 10 mon
Sex male
Size Small
Color Orange /white
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 30-Apr-2014
My Story My name is Sunny and Im a boy. I like to play with toys and other cats. I was abandoned here when I was very little so I have never lived in a home before. Please come and adopt me.
Posted on 07-Jan-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Seymour

Breed DMH
Age 1 year
Sex male
Size Small
Color Black/white
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date
My Story I was here as a small kitten and I was adopted Im not sure what happened but I got a very bad itchy skin and my new owners didnt bother to take care of me so it got very bad. They bought me back to the shelter as they said I was too much trouble. I got medicine and I feel much better. I still have some problems with itchy skin but I really need a home where I feel loved.
Posted on 30-Nov-2013
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Rose

Breed Siam Mix
Age 2 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Blue Point
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 14-Apr-2015
My Story I was rescued from animal control because my mommy turned me in there she didnt want me any more. Im a good girl but I dont like other cats and I dont like cat litter I like to do my business in desert sand. I like to be inside so you could just get sand from the desert and that will save you a penny or two.
Posted on 03-Jul-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Raison

Breed DMH
Age 2 year
Sex male
Size Small
Color Black
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 28-Aug-2013
My Story My Mother came to Animal Samaritans before I was born and I was born at the shelter. I have never had a real home of my own. I have always had to share the toys, food and love from our care takers with all the other orphans here. I would love to be your kitty cat and share the bed with you and have my own toys and my own food bowls. Please adopt me Im a good boy.
Posted on 02-Apr-2014
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

PollyAnna

Breed Domestic Medium Hair
Age 5 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Tabby/Brown
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 03-Jan-2009
My Story Hi, my name is Pollyanna. My owner brought me in with my litter mates, because they couldn’t keep all of us. I am very shy, so please no small children. Won’t you please come and take me to my new Forever Home?
Posted on 10-Apr-2009
Contact Info Rhona 343-3477

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Phantom

Breed DMH
Age 2 years
Sex male
Size Small
Color Black
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 28-Aug-2013
My Story I have been an orphan my whole life. I was abandoned here as a baby with my mommy Tiger Lilly. My brother is Raison.
Posted on 03-Jul-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Mum

Breed DSH
Age 1 year
Sex female
Size Small
Color silver Grey
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 04-Feb-2014
My Story Im beautiful I know. I was rescued from Animal Control as I had babies that were too young to stay with me there. Their future looked grim until Animal Samaritans rescued us all. They are big enough now to find homes of their own so please someone adopt me I have to live in a cage as I do not like other cats.
Posted on 01-Apr-2014
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Mimi

Breed DMH
Age 1 year
Sex female
Size Small
Color Black
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 25-Feb-2014
My Story As you can see im very sweet but a little afraid I spend a lot of my time in the corner under the tree. I was abandoned here and I dont know why. Please someone give me a home I know in time you would love me..
Posted on 06-Sep-2014
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Kelly

Breed DSH
Age 1 year
Sex female
Size Small
Color Gray/white
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 21-May-2015
My Story I have a long story. I had some kittens and my friend who is another cat named Dawn she had some kittens too. We were living with some people that didnt get us spayed and when we had our kittens they decided to get rid of us and our kids.  Lucky for us they walked into the clinic instead of animal control and the staff there were having a meeting and they took us into their care. So to make a long story short we were saved from losing our newborns at the animal control and we all came to the shelter to find new homes.
Posted on 24-Jun-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Juju Bee

Breed Chi Mix
Age 3 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Tan
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained
Adoption Price $100
Intake Date 06-Feb-2015
My Story They call me Juju Bee Im very happy that Animal Samaritans rescued me from the pound. I was very sad there because no one wanted me and my future looked slim. I have lots of dog friends here. I would like a new Mommy or daddy to love me.
Posted on 18-Feb-2015
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Jenny

Breed DSH
Age 4 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Orange
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date 08-May-2010
My Story Im very shy but I have friends here. Come see me and If I like you I might come home with you.
Posted on 11-Jul-2012
Contact Info Rhona 343-3477

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Gypsy

Breed DSH
Age 3 years
Sex female
Size Small
Color Black
Spayed/Neutered Spayed
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date
My Story I came to Animal Samaritans with a bunch of kittens. Im the kind of cat that likes you when I want to. Im not a big cuddlier unless I want it. Black is beautiful Come and adopt me.
Posted on 15-Oct-2013
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

Groucho

Breed DMH
Age 1 Year
Sex male
Size Small
Color Grey/white
Spayed/Neutered Neutered
Housetrained Yes
Adoption Price $85
Intake Date
My Story I was found as a very small kitten next door to the shelter in a trash can. I think I remember falling in and being too small to get out. The man from the store saw me and came and told the people here that I was stuck. They got me out gave me a nice meal and put me into foster care. I came back to the shelter to be neutered. Life is a little scarey to me so no small children please. a nice quiet home would be best for me.
Posted on 30-Nov-2013
Contact Info Rhona

 

Please note that we make every effort to keep this website up-to-date however, the animal you may be interested in may have already been adopted. Animal Samaritans cannot adopt out any animal that has not been spayed/neutered. Likewise there may be medical reasons that exclude a pet from immediate adoption.

For questions regarding shelter adoptions please email: rlinsell@animalsamaritans.org
Or call: 760-343-3477

What else can I do to ensure that my pet will be returned should he or she become lost?

All pets should wear identification tags at all times. Tags should include a local contact number, as well as a number for a friend or out-of-town relative. Proper identification tags are your pet’s first ticket home if he becomes lost. Microchips provide an important extra level of protection in the event your pet becomes separated from his collar and tags. Providing your pet with both tags and a microchip can help ensure a happy reunion if the unthinkable happens: your beloved pet gets lost.

How long do microchips last? Do they ever need to be replaced?

Microchips are designed to last the lifetime of a pet—a chip typically lasts at least 25 years. Chips do not need replacing. Once the microchip is implanted, it will remain there and active for the life of the pet.

IF MY PET IS TAKEN TO A VETERINARY CLINIC OR SHELTER HOW WILL THEY KNOW TO CALL ANIMAL SAMARITANS?

All animals that are brought into a veterinary clinic or animal welfare organization are routinely scanned for a microchip. In the event that a microchip is located the emergency personnel will call Animal Samaritans to see whether we have the pet registered in our database. As soon as a match has been made we will call you to let know that your pet has been found and to help to arrange a re-union.

DOES MICROCHIPPING HURT THE ANIMAL?

Animal microchips are about the size of a grain of rice and are typically implanted just beneath the skin between the shoulder blades by a veterinarian or trained member of an animal welfare organization. The process is similar to a vaccination and most animals do not react when the microchip is implanted. Once implanted the microchip remains just beneath the skin for the rest of the animal’s lifetime, a permanent form of identification.

I HAVE AN INDOOR CAT – IS THERE A NEED TO MICROCHIP?

Cats are naturally curious and unpredictable. In the event that they are drawn away from the safety of their home you need to give them the best chance of getting home safely.

MY DOG ALWAYS WEARS A COLLAR AND TAGS WHY DO I NEED TO MICROCHIP HIM?

Collars and tags may be removed or get lost and tattooing can become illegible over time – Microchipping is the only truly permanent method of identifying your dog.

WHY SHOULD I MICROCHIP MY PET?

Each year millions of lost and abandoned animals are taken in by animal welfare organizations across North America, of these animals only 14% of the dogs and 4% of the cats (estimated figures) are ever returned home. The major reason for failing to re-unite a lost pet with its owner is because the pets are unidentifiable. Microchipping offers pet owners the only truly permanent method of identifying your pet and linking the animal back to you, the owner. If you want to improve your pet’s chances of getting home in a lost pet emergency – microchipping is your best option.

ARE THERE CERTAIN DIETS AND TREATS THAT CAN IMPROVE THE HEALTH OF MY PET’S TEETH?

Specially-designed dental diets and treats can help to retard plaque and tartar build-up between
your pet’s dental cleanings and may even extend the interval between cleanings. Not all
products with a dental claim on their label, however, are as good as others and it is important
to be an informed consumer of veterinary dental products. An independent organization, the
Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC), awards a Seal of Acceptance to veterinary dental diets
and products that meet a pre-set standard in plaque and tartar reduction in animals. A listing of
products awarded the seal is available on the VOHC website (www.vohc.org).

HOW MANY TEETH DO DOGS AND CATS HAVE?

Dogs start out with 28 deciduous (baby) teeth, cats start out with 26 deciduous teeth. By six
months of age, these baby teeth fall out and are replaced by permanent teeth, 42 in the dog
and 30 in the cat.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I BRUSH MY PET’S TEETH?

Ideally, you should brush your pet’s teeth daily. Brushing less frequently than three times per
week is not productive and other methods of decreasing plaque and tartar accumulation should
be used such as specially-designed dental diets, treats, barrier sealants, antiseptic rinses, gels
and water additives.

HOW DO I BRUSH MY PET’S TEETH AT HOME?

To brush your pet’s teeth you must train your pet gradually over several weeks. Small dogs and
cats are most easily done when they are sitting on a table, counter or your lap. Larger dogs can
be sitting on the floor. Especially when you first begin, it may take two people to get the job
done, but be careful not to over-restrain your pet — keep brushing sessions short and positive.
One person can hold your pet and the other can actually do the brushing. Praise and reassure
your pet throughout the process, and don’t forget to provide a treat or reward afterwards!

Here is an example of how to get your pet used to having their teeth brushed gradually:

Step 1: Dab a bit of flavored toothpaste from your local pet store (typically these come in
flavors like chicken or beef). Don’t use toothpaste designed for humans because it could upset
your pet’s stomach. Rub the “flavored” finger gently over the pet’s mouth and teeth. Make the
initial sessions short and positive.

Step 2: Gradually, introduce gauze over the finger and gently scrub the teeth and gums in a
circular motion.

Step 3: Finally, you can introduce a soft toothbrush designed for pets. Special pet toothbrushes
are available from your veterinarian or at pet stores.

If your pet won’t cooperate with home brushing or if you already see brown tartar stains on its
teeth or red and bleeding gums, it’s time to turn to your veterinary dentist for help. Your pet
will be given general anesthesia and have their teeth cleaned above and below the gum line to
remove plaque and tartar. After the teeth are cleaned, they will be polished to remove
microscopic plaque and to make the teeth smooth to discourage plaque from clinging.

Remember, dental care is as important to your pet’s health as it is to your own. You owe it to
your pet to provide regular dental care and cleaning.

MY PET HAS BAD BREATH OR A CHIPPED TOOTH. IS IT REALLY A BIG DEAL?

Just like with humans, infected gums and teeth aren’t just a problem in the mouth for dogs and
cats. Your pet’s heart, kidneys, lungs, intestinal tract, and joints may also become infected. The
tartar and any infected areas of the mouth contain a multitude of bacteria than can ‘seed’ to
other parts of the body. Providing your pet with regular dental care will help prevent some of
these more serious side effects.

HOW CAN I TELL IF MY DOG OR CAT HAS GUM DISEASE OR OTHER DENTAL PROBLEMS? WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Start with some of the basics:

• Does your dog or cat have bad breath?
• Does your pet shy away from you when touch their mouth area?
• Does you pet drool excessively or drop food from his or her mouth?
• Have you noticed any bleeding from your pet’s mouth?
• Have you noticed a loss of appetite or weight loss (this combination can result from
diseases of many organs, and early veterinary examination is important).

If your pet will allow it, gently open its mouth and look inside. Look for the warning signs of
gum disease – red and swollen gums, a yellow-brown crust of tartar around the gumline, and
pain or bleeding when you touch the gums or mouth. Also look for discoloration and tartar or
missing, loose or broken teeth.
Seek veterinary care if you notice any of these problems. Dental disease progresses in stages —
if caught early, you can prevent further damage and save as many teeth as possible. A
professional examination will determine whether a cleaning or other dental work is required.

WHEN SHOULD I START DENTAL CARE WITH MY PET?

The earlier the better. Your veterinarian can teach you how to care for your pet’s teeth and
gums early on as well as how to keep an eye out for indicators of dental problems. Starting
early is especially important for the small breed dog population. Small breed dogs are especially
prone to periodontal disease. For their size, small dogs have relatively large teeth for their jaws,
resulting in crowding and an unfavorable environment where plaque and tartar can readily
accumulate between teeth, thereby exacerbating periodontal disease.

WILL MY PET BE ABLE TO EAT NORMALLY, ENJOY DOGGIE BISCUITS AND BONES AFTER HAVING EXTRACTIONS?

In general, dogs and cats manage extremely well following extractions, but for our patients’
comfort following extraction(s) we recommend a soft food (can or water-soaked kibble) diet for
the first 2 weeks postoperative. After this immediate postoperative period has passed, most
pets resume their normal preference of diet. Many pets with severe dental disease have been
suffering silently with low-grade chronic pain for years, and following extractions, many clients
report an improved quality of life and vigor in their pet.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I GET MY PET’S TEETH PROFESSIONALLY CLEANED?

Most domestic pets can benefit from annual professional dental cleanings performed under
general anesthesia. In particular cases, a more frequent treatment interval may be necessary. A
proper assessment of your pet’s oral health should include an oral examination and dental xrays
(radiographs), either full-mouth (all teeth) or regional (particular teeth of interest), under
general anesthesia.

IS DENTAL SCALING PERFORMED ON ANIMALS WITHOUT ANESTHESIA A SUITABLE ALTERNATIVE TO PROFESSIONAL PERIODONTAL THERAPY?

Adult pets often have established periodontal disease. In some of these pets, especially older
pets, periodontal disease has progressed beyond its early or mild stages (gingivitis). The
moderate and severe stages of periodontal disease traditionally require various therapies
(periodontal and oral surgery) in addition to dental scaling. When scaling is used as a
standalone treatment to address all stages of periodontal disease, especially when used as the
only therapy for the treatment of severe periodontal disease, it is purely cosmetic and nontherapeutic.

Pet owners naturally are concerned when anesthesia is required for their pet. However,
performing dental scaling on an unanesthetized pet is inappropriate for the following reasons:

1. Dental tartar is firmly adhered to the surface of the teeth. Scaling to remove tartar is
accomplished using ultrasonic and sonic power scalers, plus hand instruments that
must have a sharp working edge to be used effectively. Even slight head movement by
the patient could result in injury to the oral tissues of the patient, and the operator may
be bitten when the patient reacts.

2. Professional dental scaling includes scaling the surfaces of the teeth both above and
below the gingival margin (gum line), followed by dental polishing. The most critical part
of a dental scaling procedure is scaling the tooth surfaces that are within the gingival
pocket (the subgingival space between the gum and the root), where periodontal disease
is active. Because the patient cooperates, dental scaling of human teeth performed by a
professional trained in the procedures can be completed successfully without
anesthesia. However, access to the subgingival area of every tooth is impossible in an
unanesthetized canine or feline patient. Removal of dental tartar on the visible surfaces
of the teeth has little effect on a pet’s health, and provides a false sense of
accomplishment. The effect is purely cosmetic.

3. Inhalation anesthesia using a cuffed endotracheal tube provides three important
advantages – the cooperation of the patient with a procedure it does not understand,
elimination of pain resulting from examination and treatment of affected dental tissues
during the procedure, and protection of the airway and lungs from accidental aspiration.

4. A complete oral examination, which is an important part of a professional dental scaling
procedure, is not possible in an unanesthetized patient. The surfaces of the teeth facing
the tongue cannot be examined, and areas of disease and discomfort are likely to be
missed.

WE WERE SHOCKED THAT OUR VETERINARIAN RECOMMENDED TOOTH EXTRACTION FOR OUR PET, WHY AREN’T THERE OTHER TREATMENT OPTIONS?

When periodontal disease is left untreated, tooth loss becomes a reality for many pets. Many
clients are shocked that their family veterinarian has advised extraction for a compromised
tooth. At face value, this indeed may seem drastic. When detected at the severe stages of
periodontal disease, where significant amounts of bone and soft tissue have been lost along the
roots of the tooth, the options for saving teeth are extremely limited, and tooth extraction is
often the only course of action to restore oral health. If the diseased tooth is not treated or
extracted, neighboring teeth may be compromised.

OUR DOG HAS A FRACTURED TOOTH AND DOESN’T SEEM BOTHERED BY IT, DO WE REALLY NEED TO HAVE IT TREATED?

Yes, especially if the internal portion of the tooth or pulp is involved. The pulp of the tooth
contains the blood vessels and nerves of the tooth. Teeth with pulp exposure are painful. When
the pulp of a tooth is exposed, bacteria can enter into the tooth and infect the pulp. Often,
there are no notable outward symptoms (facial swelling) until very late in the course of the
infection. Because the infection is localized at the root tip (tooth root abscess), and since the
tooth root is hidden from view within the jaw bone, the classic sign of facial swelling is not seen
until the infection has worked its way through the jaw bone overlying the root.

WHEN ARE ANTIBIOTICS INDICATED FOR DENTAL PROCEDURES IN ANIMALS?

Following routine dental scaling, the majority of patients will experience transient bacteria in
the blood stream. In healthy animals, their immune response is effective at eliminating bacteria
from the bloodstream and resulting in the rapid decline of bacteria without the use of systemic
antibiotics. For animals with underlying systemic disease (heart, liver and kidney), that are
immune compromised and/or have severe oral infections, antibiotics are indicated. These
moderate and high risk patients should receive antibiotics 1 hour before their dental procedure.

DO YOU HAVE TO PUT MY PET UNDER USING ANESTHESIA TO PERFORM DENTAL WORK?

In order to appropriately diagnose and treat your pet’s oral disease, sedation or general
anesthesia is usually necessary. Safety is our number one priority. Animal Samaritans designs
an individualized anesthesia protocol based upon the results of preoperative laboratory tests,
the specific oral disease being treated in your pet, and any connected health condition (i.e.,
heart, kidney or liver disease) your pet may have.

How soon should I spay/neuter my pet?

Animal Samaritans recommends spaying or neutering your puppy or kitten once your pet has completed his or her first series of vaccinations, has reached at least two pounds, and has reached four months in age.

How safe is spaying and neutering?

The procedure is a safe and relatively simple operation. In rare cases, the veterinarian may advise against the procedure for older pets or animals in noticeably poor health. That said, most cats and dogs can be safely spayed or neutered between 4 months and 5 years of age; we recommend waiting until your pet has exceeded two pounds and received all of his or her initial vaccinations, which is usually around 4 months of age.

Do you spay and neuter feral or community cats?

Yes.  We spay and neuter feral or community cats for $39.  On average, we can spay/neuter up to six feral animals a day.  If you trap a feral cat, do not feed the cat the night before his/her surgery. You must bring him or her to our veterinary clinic between 7:30am – 8am for surgery. 72-120 Pet Land Place, Thousand Palms, CA 92276. You can must pick up the cat around 3:30 – 5pm that same afternoon.  You should allow the animal time to recover from his or her anesthesia before releasing it back to its colony. Thank you for helping to reduce cat overpopulation, neglect, and starvation.

Why does Animal Samaritans charge so little for spay and neuter services?

Pet spaying & neutering is important. Animal Samaritans’ mission is to improve the lives and animals and people. One way we help people is by providing professional and affordable spay & neuter services for their pets.  In turn, this helps their pets live longer, healthier lives, and ensures that they do not contribute to the problem of pet overpopulation, animal homelessness, and high euthanasia rates in America’s public shelters.  Millions of animals are put to sleep each year in America’s public animal shelters, which is both a moral and financial burden on the American tax payer. Professionals in the field of animal welfare have long agreed that spaying & neutering is the most effective way to reduce the problem of pet overpopulation and the needless suffering and loss of life for millions of unwanted dogs and cats.

How much does it cost to spay or neuter my pet?

Animal Samaritans has been providing high-quality, low-cost pet spay & neuter services since 1981.  While prices are subject to change, the cost to spay or neuter your pet is: $96 for cats; $118 for dogs under 50 pounds, $128 for dogs between 50 and 100 pounds, and $158 for dogs over 100 pounds.